Step Right Up // Keith Young Answers AoB’s Candidate Forum Questionnaire

Tell us something about your transportation habits. How do you get around Asheville?

I am one of many Asheville residents that rely solely on an automobile. However, since I work downtown I tend to walk most places while in the area. It’s very convenient to move in and around the city when essential amenities are close. Shaping development with density in mind gives residents easier access to cleaner, greener alternative transportation methods Also, I’m not an avid biker however, being able to utilize bicycles downtown if readily available would be a sensible addition. Quick and easy access to a system of bicycles throughout our metro area, near bus stops, and greenways could help compliment our multi-modal transportation plans. Once the greenways connect, I can envision a total network of travelers engaging in a bike share system with limitless possibilities. You may even see me riding one through downtown on a lunch break running errands.

What do you consider to be the most significant transportation advancement in Asheville and what impact does it have on our community?

Giving consideration to all things, I would have to simplify this answer. Our bus system has made incremental advancements. I believe we have a great deal of work ahead of us. Our goal should focus on making this system a tool for everyone. Sunday Bus service and extended hours have assisted many Asheville residents in closing the gaps of their basic everyday needs. This was a small victory when viewing the scale of a system that could do more to serve Asheville residents. A victory none the less and an achievement .

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AoB hosts Get There Asheville // Oct. 22 at Clingman Cafe

GetTherePosterDuring each election cycle, Asheville on Bikes (AoB) hosts two candidate forums focused on the issues of Asheville’s transportation systems and needs.

AoB’s second candidate forum, held prior to the general election, is called Get There AVL. It will be hosted by New Mountain in downtown Asheville. The event is scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 22nd from 6:30 to 9pm, so please save the date.

Read Their Take on Transportation

All current Asheville city council candidates have received an invitation and questionnaire from AoB. Candidate responses will be posted to AoB’s website in the order they are received. Each candidate was asked: 

  1. Tell us something about your transportation habits. How do you get around Asheville?
  2. What do you consider to be the most significant transportation advancement in Asheville and what impact does it have on our community?
  3. Please identify one way in which you’ve worked to make Asheville safer for pedestrians, transit users, and / or cyclists. What did you learn from this experience?
  4. What do you consider to be Asheville’s primary transportation challenge and how do you propose to fix it?

Click Below for Candidates’ Responses to AoB’s Forum Questionnaire:

Richard Liston>>

Carl Mumpower>>

Corey Atkins>>

Julie Mayfield >>

Dee Williams >>

LaVonda Payne>>

Joe Grady>>

Ken Michalove>>

Brian Haynes>>

Rich Lee>>

Grant Millin>>

Lindsey Simerly>>

John Miall>>

Marc Hunt>>

Keith Young>>

 

Step Right Up Facebook Event Page 

AoB’s second candidate forum, held prior to the general election, is called Get There AVL. It will be hosted by New Mountain in downtown Asheville. The event is scheduled for Thursday, Oct. 22nd from 6:30 to 9pm, so please save the date.

 

 

Get There AVL Facebook Event Page 

Step Right Up // Marc Hunt Answers AoB’s Candidate Forum Questionnaire

Tell us something about your transportation habits. How do you get around Asheville?

Automobile, cycle, walk, occasional transit.

What do you consider to be the most significant transportation advancement in Asheville and what impact does it have on our community?

Past 5 years – improvement in routes and timing of the transit system.
Emerging – bicycle infrastructure.

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Step Right Up // John Miall Answers AoB’s Candidate Forum Questionnaire

Tell us something about your transportation habits. How do you get around Asheville?

I typically drive, ride my motorcycle, or walk (within a mile of home.)

What do you consider to be the most significant transportation advancement in Asheville and what impact does it have on our community?

In my lifetime, I-240 was significant in that it opened up Asheville. In more recent years the interest in multi-modal transportation has been an asset as well as a challenge.

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Step Right Up // Lindsey Simerly Answers AoB’s Candidate Forum Questionnaire

Tell us something about your transportation habits. How do you get around Asheville?

Our personal transportation choices impact our environment, our traffic congestion, and our quality of life. Throughout my 13 years in Asheville I have used a variety of forms of transportation. I have relied on a bicycle as my primary transportation. I rode a fuel-efficient motorcycle. I drove a heavy-duty biodiesel truck when I worked construction. I walked and rode the bus for a time.

Currently, raising a toddler, I drive more often than I used to. Knowing that I was going to be driving with my child, I selected an environmentally responsible car in my price range, a Toyota Prius. My family and I plan ahead so we can limit car trips, carpool, and walk whenever possible.

What do you consider to be the most significant transportation advancement in Asheville and what impact does it have on our community?

Over the last several years Asheville has increased investment in transportation choice, which increases opportunity, affordability, and sustainability. We got 9 new hybrid buses. We added miles of greenways and bike lanes. We added Sunday bus service and increased the number of buses that run on 30-minute routes.

Each improvement is very good on its own, but the combination was intentional and it is this multimodal approach that is the most significant advancement. Recognizing that our transportation options are interconnected is critical and is the basis for the complete streets concept. The reality is that some people will drive cars. Some people will ride bikes. Some people will ride the bus. Others will walk. When we expand our transportation options we create more opportunities for people who can’t drive due to their age, health, or income; we allow people to choose lower-cost alternatives for getting around; and we reduce our CO2 emissions (by reducing dependence on cars).

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Step Right Up // Grant Millin Answers AoB’s Candidate Forum Questionnaire

Tell us something about your transportation habits. How do you get around Asheville?

I hike/walk, but I live in Oteen. The variability of ART bus timing and a range of reasons makes automobile the best way to reach downtown and other points in the area if you live in Oteen.

It will be interesting to see what more the community team can do with multimodal innovation based on current factors when it comes to basics like where things are happening folks want to get to in contrast to where people live in Asheville.

What do you consider to be the most significant transportation advancement in Asheville and what impact does it have on our community?

I am sure there is a great list of multimodal innovations that have taking place over the years here. For me personally and I think for many others, passenger rail to Asheville would be an epoch in multimodal innovation.

There are all kinds of probably reasons why and what not passenger rail to Asheville hasn’t happened. But the last study on the matter is 15 years old now. Without a feasibility study and environmental impact statement, we don’t have choices because we don’t have good information on passenger rail to Asheville questions.

I developed a package solution in this article.

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