Your Bike is Your Queen in 2016 // Support AoB at Bike Love

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Bike Love
Saturday, February 13
th, 2016
ISIS Restaurant & Music Hall
743 Haywood Road, West Asheville

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+add a 2016 AoB Membership and Save $5

Bike Love Schedule

6pm-8pm
Exclusive VIP Dinner w/ New Belgium and Isis Restaurant.  

8pm-8:45pm
Doors Open
Silent Auction
Membership Activation
Presentations by leaders in transportation advocacy, health, and urban bicycle culture.

  • Lisa Diaz Riegel, Executive Director of Bike Walk / NC
  • Terri March, Health Improvement Specialist Mountain Area Health Education Center
  • Ann Silver & Drew Cistola, Asheville on Bikes Youth Program Instructors
  • Mike Sule, Director of Asheville on Bikes

9pm – 11pm
Music by The Digs w/ Ryan Rn’B Barber
Industry Nine Wheelset Drawing

11pm – 1am
DJ Marley

Share Your Photos at Bike Love

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You are Asheville on Bikes, and Bike Love celebrates you. Upload your photos here, and we’ll include them in the signature slideshow of Bike Love 2016 on February 13th at Isis Restaurant and Music Hall!

OR – Tag your bike photos on Instagram or Facebook with #bikelove16 and we’ll grab em.

See you at Bike Love!

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Write by 12/29 to Shape Cycling Safety Laws

BikeLanesAlertNCDOT has released a draft report of recommendations for the H232 Bicycle Safety Law Study. The draft report includes recommendations that differ substantially from the recommendations of the H232 committee. For instance, the NCDOT report recommends legislation limiting riding abreast (the committee voted unanimously against such legislation) and recommends legislation requiring bicyclists to ride on the right side of marked travel lane.

The Draft report may be read here: http://www.bikewalknc.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/H-232-report.pdf

The Draft Appendices to the report may be read here: http://www.bikewalknc.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/Appendices_sm.pdf

NCDOT’s page that includes committee meeting minutes is here: http://www.ncdot.gov/bikeped/lawspolicies/

BikeWalk NC and Asheville on Bikes urges cyclists in NC to review the draft report and send NCDOT comments before December 29. Together we recommend that no new legislation be promoted to restrict where a bicyclist may ride within a marked travel lane or riding abreast within a single marked travel lane.

A working group of NCDOT representative and North Carolina officials have compiled the following comments to help inform the NC Legislature on HB 232

Pros
1. Recommend that drivers be able to cross double yellow line when passing a cyclist
2. Mandate a 4 foot clearance when passing a cyclist
3. No requirement for cyclists to carry ID
4. Allow right arm indication of a right turn. Left arm indicator is often misinterpreted.
5. Bicycles would be on par with motorcycles in terms of vulnerability and liability

Cons
1. Maximum of two abreast cyclists under any circumstances, exception is an approved bike race.
2. Requirement for bright clothing
3. Cyclists to ride as far to the right of the right travel lane as possible and safe (There are no current restrictions on where cyclists position themselves, only a best practice recommendation to ride in the area where the right wheel of a motor vehicle would track.)
4. A requirement to obtain local permits for groups of 30 or more
5. No headphones or any other distracting items.

Please email questions and comments to NCDOT (at bwpoole@ncdot.gov) by 5:00 p.m. on December 29, 2015. Include “H232 Comments” in the title. Comments should be addressed to “NCDOT” or to the “Joint Legislative Transportation Oversight Committee.” Email comments will be included as an addendum to the appendix. The final report and appendix will be sent to the Joint Legislative Transportation Oversight Committee by December 31, 2015.

Thanks to BikeWalk NC for this information.

AoB Submits Comments on I-26 Connector

Part of Asheville on Bikes’ mission is to provide guidance at a state and local level when transportation planning and bicycle infrastructure intersect. During the public comment period of the proposed Interstate 26 Connector project, we felt a strong responsibility to weigh in — not to endorse any single plan —  to simply make the priorities of our members’ known as it might apply to any proposed plan. With that in mind, Asheville on Bikes submitted the following letter to the NCDOT and the Asheville City Council.

If you feel motivated to submit comments of your own, before the December 16 deadline, feel free to reference any part of the letter below or these “5 KEY POINTS” and give your comments at https://mysidewalk.com/organizations/290199/comment-form

  1. Ensure the preferred alternative is consistent with all relevant local plans. This includes on-street bicycle infrastructure identified in the 2008 City of Asheville Comprehensive Bicycle Plan and greenway corridors in the 2013 Asheville Greenways Master Plan.
  1. Amboy Road should be reduced from a proposed four lanes to two lanes of automobile traffic. This will reduce vehicle speeds and promote the safe movement of bicyclists and pedestrians as they access the French Broad River corridor from their neighborhoods.
  1. The Haywood Road interchange design should incorporate a separated cycle track to safely move bicyclists on this popular road. A separated cycle track will reduce the potential for collisions and is needed because Haywood Road consistently receives the most bicycle traffic of any road in Asheville, as evidenced in the city’s annual bicycle traffic counts.
  1. The West Asheville Greenway should include paved access for pedestrians and bicyclists from all local roads that parallel or dead-end into the greenway corridor. This will allow users to access the greenway without traveling on major roads where safety is a greater concern.
  1. Bicycle lanes should be installed on Patton Avenue east of the Jeff Bowen Bridge to facilitate the safe movement of bicyclists into the downtown area. These bicycle lanes will provide a connection with existing bicycle lanes on Clingman Avenue, Hilliard Avenue, and other streets downtown. This request is also consistent with recommended infrastructure improvements in the 2008 City of Asheville Comprehensive Bicycle Plan.

Know the history of the I-26 Corridor Project and Asheville Design Center

AoB’s Letter to the NCDOT…

Re: I-26 Connector

Dear Mr. Joyner,

As an organization that seeks to support and enhance bicycling opportunities in the city of Asheville, we are writing today to submit I-26 comments that relate most specifically to bicycle related matters. Specific comments are listed below and organized by section.

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You’ve done so much. You’ve only just begun. Help AoB help Asheville.

Dear AoB Supporter,AOB_Clint_rr3

When you first biked in downtown Asheville, what did you notice? If you’re like most in our community, you probably had a hard time finding a complete bike friendly route to get to your destination.

Why? Because Asheville’s infrastructure development is only five years old. And since that first bike ride, what changes have you noticed?

Your voice, your volunteerism, and your contributions have helped make critical changes for biking in Asheville.  We are so grateful for helping to make these changes possible, and as we continue to gain ground in our community, your generosity will continue to determine our success.

You are the HEART of Asheville on Bikes! You made 2015 a BIG year…

  • Your participation helped defeat state legislation which jeopardized the implementation of bike lanes and sidewalks on state owned roads.
  • You successfully advocated for Asheville’s first protected bike lane as part of the RADTIP project.
  • You partnered with the City of Asheville, the West Asheville Business Association, and the North Carolina Department of Transportation for the first on-street bike corral.
  • Your voices were heard and a 5 foot bike lane on Craven Street became reality.
  • Participation and the number of community rides continues to grow each year.
  • You created new partnerships with the Blue Ridge Bicycle Club, the University of North Carolina,  and enabled Asheville to host Cycle Smart, adult bicycle education classes.
  • You created a transformative partnership with the Asheville City Schools Foundation to provide after school bicycle education to middle school students.
  • You played a meaningful role in our community by hosting Asheville city candidate forums to inform public of transportation issues and candidate positions.

Thanks to you, Asheville on Bikes continues to push the pedals to advance Asheville’s urban cycling. We’re on a roll, but to sustain this cadence, your support is needed. We’re asking you to fuel the Asheville on Bike’s engine – by donating to our operating budget with a year-end gift.

Please click here to give online»

Thank you so much for your help!

Warm regards,

Mike Sule

Director of Asheville on Bikes

Button Up Birthday – Thursday, Dec. 3rd

Asheville on Bikes celebrates nine years of bicycle advocacy on Thursday, Dec. 3rd at Isis Restaurant and Music Hall. Join us for an upscale evening and learn about AoB’s on going goals for the new year. Representatives from AoB’s committees will present updates on their work and attendees will learn how they can support the great work.

Support AoB's continued growth

Support AoB’s continued growth

6:30 – 7:15 Reception, music, and food

7:15 – 8:00 Presentations from AoB’s policy, education, and events committee

8:00 – 8:30 Appreciations

The $40 ticket includes piano jazz, heavy hors d’oeuvres, and a beverage. RSVP and purchase tickets through AoB’s Eventbrite.